How to Choose The Best Law School For You

Choosing which college to attend is a tough decision every college student has had to mull over. Beyond choosing the correct university or college that is a good fit for yourself financially and culturally, there is the added layer of finding a school with the programs that are the best suited to meet your needs. This is especially crucial when you are choosing a law school! Some of the best law schools include: Yale University: Yale offers top-notch financial aid advising for current students and alumni, career counseling, and competitive clinical training. Stanford University: Stanford’s Law School offers joint degree programs, which are attractive alternatives to more traditional law programs—no wonder Stanford is commonly rated one of the best schools in the country! University of Chicago: Regularly ranking in the top 5 law schools in the country, the University of Chicago retains its edge by staying on the bleeding edge of the application of social science to law. If you’re interested in social science and its intersection with law, then the University of Chicago may be the school for you! What should you consider when choosing a law school? While there are some factors that may be unique to choosing a law school, there are many variables that you should consider that are the same as every other college student. Here are a few factors to considering carefully: Location: The very important question—where do you want to be located? Not only does this mean living off campus or on campus, but also where your school is in general. If you know where you want to live post graduation, then you should attempt to find a school in that general area. By doing so, you can start building up your professional network right away once you get there, and you’ll create some powerful connections prior to entering the workforce. Specialized programs: Are there specialized programs that put one school above the rest of the pack that would help you advance in your career? Campus: What is the campus like? Do you want it to be integrated into a city or do you like a large, standalone campus? Where do you want to be located in general on the campus? If you are seriously considering a school, you should definitely give their campus a visit! Faculty: A school’s faculty, by and large, will have the biggest impact on your life outside of school. Studying the faculty of a law school is especially important if you are considering postgraduate studies—on grad school applications, you will certainly be asked who you will want to work with. Related posts: Georgetown Invites Law Students to Participate in Crisis...

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Top Law Schools 2015

The decision to apply to law school is not an easy one. The application process is rigorous, the cost of attending law school is exorbitant, and in today’s economic climate, many law school graduates are faced with the additional challenge of finding work to help repay their academic debts. As Miami-based attorney Kendall Coffey points out, “Ironically, while thousands of new law graduates fret about the chronic joblessness that awaits them, tens of millions of Americans need attorneys but cannot afford them,” of the complicated state of the legal field awaiting new law school grads today.   Despite these challenges, law school is a vital part of an aspiring lawyer’s journey, and there are many organizations, such as the American Bar Association, that are advocating for financial reform to make law school more accessible to students. If you’re thinking about applying to law school, there are an impressive list of schools to choose from. Here are some of the top law schools, according to ranking reports from top legal and educational organizations:   Yale University – Making the top spot on multiple lists for the best law schools of 2015/2016, Yale University’s Law School offers excellent financial aid advising for both current students and alumni, career counseling, and competitive clinical training. Yale Law School allows first-year students to represent clients in legal clinics, and is renowned for its academic staff. Yale ranked #1 in the U.S. News and World Report’s Best Law Schools for 2016.   Stanford University – Stanford University’s Law School offers joint degree programs that provide an attractive alternative to more traditional law programs. Ranked #2 in both the U.S. News and World Report’s Best Law Schools for 2016 and in the 2015 Above the Law Top 50 Law School Rankings, it’s clear that Stanford stands out as one of the best law schools in the country. Another notable thing about Stanford is that it has the smallest student body of any of the T14.   University of Chicago – The Law School at the University of Chicago ranked incredibly well for 2015/2016, coming in at #3 in the Above the Law roundup, and ranked #4 by the U.S. News and World Report. According to Above the Law, the University of Chicago Law School remains at the forefront of applying social science to the law, as well as offers ongoing financial aid and career support to its alumni.   Additional resources: Best Law School Rankings – U.S. News and World Report Top 50 Law Schools of 2015 – Above the Law “ABA task force on law school financing calls for reforms” – Article by Mark Hansen Related posts: Georgetown Invites Law Students to Participate in Crisis Simulation Kendall Coffey: What to Expect From the New Bar...

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Georgetown Invites Law Students to Participate in Crisis Simulation

This March, the Georgetown University Law Center hosted the National Security Crisis Law Invitational, an annual event that invites law students to sit in the hot seat as a way to prepare them for a career in national security law. The Invitational is a crisis simulation program developed by Laura Donohue, the director of Georgetown’s Center on National Security and the Law. 80 law students from nearly a dozen law schools across the country participated in this year’s National Security Crisis Law Invitational. Although this event is not a competitive in nature, students who participated spent several months preparing for it by reading up on national security law. According to Molly Greenberg, a Senior Writer at DC Inno, the students’ performances are “accessed by highly regarded national security experts.” This year, such experts included James Baker, chief judge of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Armed Forces, and Rosemary Hart, special counsel in the U.S. Department of Justice’s Office of Legal Counsel. Donohue created the National Security Crisis Law Invitational eight years ago as a way to prepare law students for high-pressure crises. “There is a lot about how we teach in law school that doesn’t work for students who are jumping into national security law,” she explained in an interview with The National Law Journal of the need for students to be exposed to real world, high stakes scenarios. “We teach the law as it is written, not how it is applied,” she says. “Law is one of many competing considerations during a national security crisis. How do you talk with policymakers? How do you bring the law into the conversation?” Students from Cornell law School, George Washington University Law School, Stanford Law School, University Virginia School of Law and other prestigious institutions were tasked with answering these questions at this year’s invitational. During the two-day event at the Georgetown University Law Center, students were asked to apply law, politics, and public opinion as they navigated and mitigated simulated threats. Participants were divided into teams and acted as departments within the National Security Council. According to Greenberg, while in these roles, they were also paired with mentors with a background working within the agency each student was assigned to. According to The National Law Journal, a large component of the simulation is how students interact and communicate with each other. Donohue has previously studied communications between participating students in order to analyze how leaders and decisions emerged during the simulation. Interestingly, “The strongest leaders weren’t necessarily from the agencies closest to the crisis, she found,” writes Karen Sloan of the Journal, “further, they were the ones who communicated most effectively.” Here are some resources for more information about the National Security Crisis Law Invitational: Crisis Simulation Puts Law Students in the Hot Seat by Karen Sloan A Crisis Simulation Put Law Students in the Roles of the Nation’s Top Decision-Makers by Molly Greenberg No related...

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